Which of these two acronyms describe the culture of your recruitment business?

Which of these two acronyms describe the culture of your recruitment business?

Acronyms and abbreviations have been used to varying degrees for hundreds of years, however they didn’t really become commonplace in the English language until the 1940’s. Since then we have seen a proliferation of acronyms across all manner of industries. You can probably think of several widely used business abbreviations off the top of your head right now…does K.I.S.S ring a bell? In the spirit of K.I.S.S, I have a couple of simple new additions for your abbreviation library. Two weeks ago my day started with a breakfast meeting where I heard a couple of short acronyms that caught my attention. A fellow entrepreneur I was meeting with had just returned from a 3 day course with Brad Sugars, the Australian Business Coach. On recounting a few of his key take-aways from the course, my friend shared with us two simple little acronyms that resonated with me, and I immediately noted them down so I could refer back to them. Now that I’m looking over those notes again I’d like to share these little acronyms with all of you fine recruitment business owners, directors and managers out there.   A Question Of Culture You may have seen my post in February titled “Why Accountability in Recruitment is All or Nothing” where I referenced Greg Bustin’s research on the subject. He concluded that “culture is a significant predictor of your future performance.”   So what does the culture of your recruitment business look like? Does it take the shape of a ‘B.E.D’ or an ‘O.A.R’? OK strange question I know, but bear with me a moment longer, here’s the meaning...
How to avoid the single biggest obstacle in recruiting executives and bringing them forward in a timely manner

How to avoid the single biggest obstacle in recruiting executives and bringing them forward in a timely manner

Executive Recruiters hunting for the best possible talent will know the challenges associated with attracting great passive candidates who are seemingly happy in their current role and have their heads down. Once you do have them engaged in a meaningful conversation you then face the challenge of having them craft a tailored CV/resume fit to present to your client. In these early stages the A grade passive candidate may well be reluctant to invest much of their precious time to produce a current and tailored CV. They would likely be writing it from scratch since they are not looking for a job. I’ve recently been working my way through a fantastic book on executive search and one tactic in relation to this challenge jumped out as a gem I wanted to share. Full credit to authors and leading practitioners David Perry and Mark Haluska of Perry Martel for what I’m about to share – I’ll briefly summarise this powerful strategy for you and would certainly recommend that for more wisdom you seek out the book Hiring Greatness. There’s a lot to be learned from these search professionals who, between them, have completed over 1800 search projects, maintaining a 99.97% success rate, and negotiating more than $380 million in salaries.   How DO you avoid the single biggest obstacle in recruiting executives and bringing them forward in a timely manner?   Introducing the ‘Confidential Candidate Brief’ (CCB). Here’s a brief extract from David and Mark’s book explaining exactly what the CCB is: ‘Essentially, what the CCB does is help screen the “I haven’t got the time to write a resume this...
Have you ignited the Compound Effect in your recruitment business?

Have you ignited the Compound Effect in your recruitment business?

The 8th wonder of the world Did you know that the great Albert Einstein said that, “Compound interest is the eighth wonder of the world. He who understands it, earns it … he who doesn’t … pays it.”   Whether you are familiar with this concept or not, you may well be wondering what the connection is to running a recruitment business. It will all become crystal clear soon.   For ease of setting the context, this diagram below illustrates the powerful effect that compound interest can have on a relatively small amount of seed money over time.   Einstein was referring to this mathematical phenomenon, widely known in the financial world, where money with compound interest experiences exponential growth. If you have ever read Darren Hardy’s book The Compound Effect then you will recognise that this same maths phenomenon works in your life choices too. I can’t think of many books that really can transcend every area of life when you apply the principles but this is one of them. And I want to specifically focus on how it can help in your recruitment business.   What is the Compound Effect? Hardy describes this as,   “The principle of reaping huge rewards from a series of small, smart choices. What’s most interesting about this process to me is that, even though the results are massive, the steps, in the moment, don’t feel significant.”   This is the magic formula for success:   Small, Smart Choices + Consistency + Time = RADICAL DIFFERENCE   Early on in the book Hardy talks about choices, and he captures the message neatly...
Why Accountability in Recruitment is All or Nothing

Why Accountability in Recruitment is All or Nothing

If your recruitment business is not getting the results you want, the problem may be lack of accountability. I’m not just referring to the individuals in the business, there are multiple layers and players in this. Take a moment and think about the 3 key parties involved in the process that a recruitment professional has to manage- the client, the candidates and the recruiters themselves. Everything needs to fall into place for a successful search to happen, and for that it requires everyone being accountable to their word. Every recruiter knows how painful it is when someone in the chain doesn’t keep their word. The challenge sits on the shoulders of the recruiter to be the one who expertly manages all the moving parts so that everyone stays accountable. So how can recruitment business owners improve this? Would it surprise you if I said there is no silver bullet? Instead, it is a mindset, a culture. We’ll circle back to that culture in a moment. Last year I discovered Greg Bustin’s book “Accountability: The Key to Driving a High Performance Culture”. Greg Bustin is a business and leadership consultant, an international speaker, and a Master Chair for Vistage International. In the book he explains this powerful trait in easy-to-understand components and as you will shortly see, there are important lessons for recruiters of all levels.   What does accountability really mean? Greg Bustin writes about accountability from the perspective of creating a high performance culture in your organisation. This in itself is extremely powerful however I feel that recruiters can, and need to, take it further by looking at how...
7 habits recruiters can learn from highly successful salespeople

7 habits recruiters can learn from highly successful salespeople

Recruiters of all levels and specialisms will know that effective selling underpins many aspects of the recruitment profession. As a former executive recruiter with both large and small firms, I know all too well that recruiters are typically very driven and set out each year to make more placements and generate more fee revenue. However I’ve observed, both through experience and real research, that recruiters often forget or even lack some the key fundamentals of effective selling. I happened to listen to an interview with top sales trainer and author of High Trust Selling, Todd Duncan, last week whilst driving. That interview really got me thinking about the relevant take-aways for recruiters and I felt compelled to share some of the key insights. So, to help you learn something new or remind you of something you knew but can now use, I’ve captured the fundamentals of selling and summarised the 7 habits as they relate to recruiters. Lets start with the fundamentals Todd Duncan opened the interview looking at what changes have affected the way businesses sell over the years, in particular he cited changes in technology and social media. One thing however that definitely has not changed are the fundamentals of selling. The fundamentals of selling that Duncan refers to are as follows: Acquiring customers strategically Optimising that customer’s experience Retaining that customer Cultivating the relationship with that customer Multiplying the repeat and referral business from that customer With the backdrop of these fundamentals laid out, Duncan then went on to tell us about how ‘successful sales outcomes originate from great habits’. What are the habits that successful salespeople deploy...